Faculties in Europe

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Warsaw, Poland

Faculty of Applied Informatics and Mathematics

Wydział Zastosowań Informatyki i Matematyki

Subject area: computer science
University website: www.sggw.pl/en/
The research at the Faculty is concentrated on applications of mathematics and informatics in many disciplines. The most important research areas are: computer vision and image recognition, econometric modeling in natural sciences and business, mathematical modeling in biology, advanced data mining.
Faculty
Faculty may refer to:
Informatics
Informatics is a branch of information engineering. It involves the practice of information processing and the engineering of information systems, and as an academic field it is an applied form of information science. The field considers the interaction between humans and information alongside the construction of interfaces, organisations, technologies and systems. As such, the field of informatics has great breadth and encompasses many subspecialties, including disciplines of computer science, information systems, information technology and statistics. Since the advent of computers, individuals and organizations increasingly process information digitally. This has led to the study of informatics with computational, mathematical, biological, cognitive and social aspects, including study of the social impact of information technologies.
Mathematics
Mathematics (from Greek μάθημα máthēma, "knowledge, study, learning") is the study of such topics as quantity, structure, space, and change. It has no generally accepted definition.
Mathematics
The science of mathematics presents the most brilliant example of how pure reason may successfully enlarge its domain without the aid of experience.
Immanuel Kant, Critique of Pure Reason (1781) Tr. Max Müller (1881) p. 610.
Mathematics
I united the majority of well-informed persons into a club, which we called by the name of the Junto, and the object of which was to improve our understandings. ... The first members of our club were...
Thomas Godfrey, a self-taught mathematician, and afterwards inventor of what is now called Hadley's dial; but he had little knowledge out of his own line, and was insupportable in company, always requiring, like the majority of mathematicians that have fallen in my way, an unusual precision in everything that is said, continually contradicting, or making trifling distinctions—a sure way of defeating all the ends of conversation. He very soon left us.
Benjamin Franklin, The Life and Miscellaneous Writings of Benjamin Franklin (1839)
Mathematics
A marveilous newtrality have these things mathematicall and also a strange participation between things supernaturall, imortall, intellectuall, simple and indivisible, and things naturall, mortall, sensible, compounded and divisible.
John Dee, The mathematicall praeface to the Elements of geometrie of Euclid of Megara (1570) as editor of Euclid's Elements, translated by Henry Billingsley.
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