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university type - Poland  
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Warsaw, Poland

Faculty of Veterinary Medicine

Wydział Medycyny Weterynaryjnej

Subject area: medicine, health care
University website: www.sggw.pl/en/
The Mission of the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine is: • to provide a high quality teaching environment and excellent research-based teaching • to educate veterinarians able to handle a wide variety of health, welfare and management problems with farm and companion animals • to undertake high quality research to support the teaching process as well as postgraduate and continuing education • to provide veterinary care for all animal species through faculty clinics
Faculty
Faculty may refer to:
Medicine
Medicine is the science and practice of the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of disease. Medicine encompasses a variety of health care practices evolved to maintain and restore health by the prevention and treatment of illness. Contemporary medicine applies biomedical sciences, biomedical research, genetics, and medical technology to diagnose, treat, and prevent injury and disease, typically through pharmaceuticals or surgery, but also through therapies as diverse as psychotherapy, external splints and traction, medical devices, biologics, and ionizing radiation, amongst others.
Veterinary Medicine
Veterinary medicine is the branch of medicine that deals with the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of disease, disorder and injury in non-human animals. The scope of veterinary medicine is wide, covering all animal species, both domesticated and wild, with a wide range of conditions which can affect different species.
Medicine
When taken
To be well shaken.
George Colman the Younger, Broad Grins, The Newcastle Apothecary, Stanza 12.
Medicine
No cataplasm so rare,
Collected from all simples that have virtue
Under the moon, can save the thing from death.
William Shakespeare, Hamlet (1600-02), Act IV, scene 7, line 144.
Medicine
The ignorance and general incompetency of the average graduate of the American medical Schools, at the time when he receives the degree which turns him loose upon the community, is something horrible to contemplate.
Charles Eliot, President of Harvard University (1869). In response to this call for reform, Harvard Professor of Surgery Harold Bigelow replied "He actually proposes to have written examinations for the degree of doctor of medicine. I had to tell him that he knew nothing about the quality of Harvard medical students. More than half of them can barely write. Of course they can't pass written examinations...No medical school has thought it proper to risk large existing classes and larger receipts by introducing more rigorous standards".
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